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Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

By John Roberts.

Lindblad Expeditions welcomed the newest ship, the 100-passenger, 50-stateroom National Geographic Venture, to its fleet at a ceremony at the historic Treasure Island Pier 1 in San Francisco. My wife Colleen and I joined the inaugural cruise, a quick two-day adventure in San Francisco Bay in early December. The cruise was over much too quickly but gave us a great sense of how wonderful it is to sail an expedition voyage with Lindblad, and in such comfort on a beautiful new vessel.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Lindblad Expeditions founder and CEO Sven-Olof Lindblad tells a little about the Lindblad story during the christening ceremony of the new National Geographic Venture. Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic have had an alliance in cruising since 2004.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Crew line the deck in front of the bridge during the christening alongside the historic Treasure Island Pier 1 in San Francisco. The shiny and new NatGeo Venture, which was built in the U.S. at the Nichols Brothers Shipyard on Whidbey Island in Washington, will sail seasons in Baja California, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska.

 

Into the Northwest Passage 2020

Photo: John Roberts

Capt. Andrew Cook — yes, he says he’s proud to live up to his name as a Captain Cook — is master of the vessel.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

There is an open-bridge policy on National Geographic Venture, which means you can stop by to see how the navigation of the ship works.

 

Into the Northwest Passage 2020

Photo: John Roberts

The bow area is the best spot to enjoy scenic sailing. We all rushed out for our sunset sailaway in San Francisco Bay toward the Golden Gate Bridge.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

The bow even has a raised platform in the middle so passengers can better see wildlife in the surrounding waters during the voyage.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

The sun is quickly fading in the distance, just past our view of Alcatraz Island.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Capt. Andrew Cook welcomes passengers onboard his spanking-new ship. The lounge area is a comfy space and a natural gathering spot for pre-dinner cocktails and to hear talks from the ship’s field staff and naturalists.

 

Into the Northwest Passage 2020

Photo: John Roberts

The dining room onboard National Geographic Venture features a buffet for breakfast and lunch. You can find numerous healthy choices, like organic chicken, salads, red and golden beets, and quinoa. There’s also a carving station and you’ll always find sweets to tempt you at the buffet, too.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

The open-seating dining room on NatGeo Venture offers a moving window on the world.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

This is my healthy breakfast — an omelet with turkey sausage, some kiwi, yogurt and other fruit.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

I was amazed at my first meal, a lunch that was loaded with goodness from the buffet. I typically have trouble finding healthy choices on most cruise ships but not on National Geographic Venture.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

I chose the rack of lamb for dinner. It was a good pick. The menu also always offers a seafood and vegetarian option.

 

Into the Northwest Passage 2020

Photo: John Roberts

Colleen said this avocado mousse with passionfruit, meringue and hint of beetroot and salt was the best dessert she has ever had.

 

Into the Northwest Passage 2020

Photo: John Roberts

Our cabin had plenty of open shelving, which I found nice to organize and have easy access to my camera equipment and other items.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

The bed was fairly comfy in our stateroom No. 217, which has a balcony.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Binoculars are at the ready in the lounge for when wildlife is within sight.

 

Into the Northwest Passage 2020

Photo: John Roberts

Some of your activities take you into chilly waters, and Lindblad Expeditions has you covered with wetsuits.  There’s also a telescope that sits at the front of the lounge so you can peep out on the scenery as you wish.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Or, you can just make like you see something at the front of the ship and sneak off with some more goodies from the snack area. No one will judge you.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

There is a well-stocked bar in the lounge, with cocktails, wines and craft beers at the ready. We found the hotel staff onboard to be unfailingly friendly and good at anticipating passenger needs.

 

Photo: John Roberts

On Day 2, we headed out for our adventures. The marina at the back of the ship is where you load into Zodiacs.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

We enjoyed a skiff tour around San Francisco Bay with our guide Emily Pickering.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

National Geographic Venture sits off Angel Island in the bay.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

The Sun Deck is at the back of the ship. It’s a wonderful place for enjoying the views and it’s also where the morning stretch class takes places each day.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

In the afternoon, we went ashore at Angel Island for a hike at Mount Livermore.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

The sunny weather made for ideal hiking conditions on the first day of December.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Nearing the top of Mount Livermore, we can see the skyline of San Francisco and much of the bay.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Two happy hikers enjoying reaching the peak. Our hike was five miles roundtrip.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

We made it back onboard before sunset and settled in with a quick walk around the promenade on NatGeo Venture.

 

Lindblad Expeditions’ New National Geographic Venture

Photo: John Roberts

Then, it was time to reward ourselves with well-earned brews after a day of thrills. We quickly fell in love with the friendly Sebastian who was always there with a smile — and our beers.

 

Photo: John Roberts

The author gets another look at San Francisco Bay and breathes in the fresh air aboard the new National Geographic Venture.

Click the photo  ⬆️⬆️⬆️ for John’s VIDEO overview of the Nat Geo Venture!

 

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Big Ships Small Ships

By Ted Scull & Heidi Sarna.

Small cruise ships are different than big ships in myriad ways.

  • Well, there’s the very size of course. One is a city, the other is a village.
  • Then there’s the variety of things to do and eat on board — one’s a buffet piled high with lots of everything and the other is a curated prix fixe menu of just what you need and no more.
  • One you may get lost on, the other never.
  • Your cabin may be more than 100 feet above the sea on the biggies, but on a small ship, never more than a few feet above the water.
  • The smallies can pull right up to most any pier in rivers, canals, lakes and bays, while the mega ships can only get into deep water ports, sometimes having to anchor off shore or dock in industrial terminals or miles from town.

You get the drift.

Read more about small ships vs big ships here. And here, for 11 FAQs about small-ship cruising.

The following images clearly illustrate the differences between big ship cruising and small ship cruising. Have a gander and decide which you prefer  ….

 

In which port would you prefer to board your ship?
Big Ships Small Ships

Boarding the small ship way. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Or this …..

 

Big Ships Small Ships

Boarding the biiiggggggg ships. * Photo: Port of Miami

 

What is more appealing ….

Sailing aboard a skyscraping block of flats spread over 13 decks with seemingly endless options and multiple banks of lifts to ease vertical exploration or …… finding everything on just five decks?

Big Ships Small Ships

Endless decks with endless diversions. * Photo: Ted Scull from a brochure

 

Or this …..

 

Big Ships Small Ships

Small ships have a handful of passenger decks, typically just 2 to 5. * Photo: Ted Scull from a brochure

 

Do you want your top viewing deck occupied by this sinuous toy …

Or do you want a wide open deck for impromptu deck games or a deck chair?  Adults may prefer the latter and kids the former.

Big Ships Small Ships

The deck toys on a mega ship. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Or this ….

 

Big Ships Small Ships

This cozy cruiser’s top deck hosts some deck chairs and an exercise bike. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Ok, most people like to have a cabin with a balcony…

But with a big city number of neighbors or a small village?

Big Ships Small Ships

A sea of balconies on a biiiiggggg ship. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Or this ….

 

Big Ships Small Ships

Some small ships have balcony cabins, but their sheer numbers won’t overwhelm you. * Photo: American Cruise Lines

 

 

Do you like your ship’s bow plastered with art …

… to look like this or traditionally painted and including just the ship’s name?

Big Ships Small Ships

Big ship hulls can be a vast muralist’s canvas. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Or this ….

 

Big Ships Small Ships

Small ships display their name and no more — elegant and clean. * Photo: Ted Scull.

 

 

Do you like a pool packed with humanity, or one with just a few souls?
Big Ships Small Ships

A mega ship pool packed with people. * Photo: Heidi Sarna

 

Or this ….

 

Big Ships Small Ships

Small ship pools are small and so are the numbers in them. * Photo: Heidi Sarna

 

© This article is protected by copyright, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the author. All Rights Reserved. QuirkyCruise.com.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

American Duchess

By Peter Knego.

American Queen Steamboat Company (AQSC) provided a glimpse of its newest addition, the 1,600-gt, 166-guest AMERICAN DUCHESS prior to her christening in New Orleans.

American Duchess

AMERICAN DUCHESS departing New Orleans on her Coast Guard trials. * Photo: Peter Knego

The AMERICAN DUCHESS is the third and newest vessel in river cruise line American Queen Steamboat Company’s (AQSC) fleet, which also includes the legendary Mississippi River steamboat AMERICAN QUEEN and the grand Columbia River paddlewheeler AMERICAN EMPRESS.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS was retrofitted with a genuine, functioning paddlewheel that cost $2 million. * Photo: Peter Knego

The 340-by-100-foot vessel was completely rebuilt from the hull of the 1995-built casino boat BETTENDORF CAPRI. Major structural work, which included the addition of a third deck and the installation of a working paddlewheel (to augment four z-drives and two bow thrusters) was completed at the Bollinger Shipyard in Amelia, Louisiana, near New Orleans.

American Duchess

AQSC COO and President Ted Sykes hosts a media tour of the AMERICAN DUCHESS on the eve of her christening. * Photo: Peter Knego

During a recent press gathering, Ted Sykes, AQSC’s president and COO, shared that rebuilding an existing ship versus building one from scratch cut a year off the delivery date and cut costs by 40%.

After already having delayed the ship’s cruising debut from June to August 14, inclement weather further stalled the outfitting and trials, resulting in the scrubbing of a two-night press and agent preview cruise scheduled for August 11.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS sails upriver from New Orleans Riverwalk and under the St. Charles Bridge. * Photo: Peter Knego

The ship passed Coast Guard trials with flying colors on August 11 and returned to her berth at New Orleans Riverwalk to complete outfitting, with not a moment to spare.

The media was given a brief look at some of the ship’s public spaces and treated to dinner and a show on board on August 13, the night prior to the DUCHESS‘ christening on August 14.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Deluxe Suite sitting area. * Photo: Peter Knego

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Deluxe Suite bedroom. * Photo: Peter Knego

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Deluxe Suite loo. * Photo: Peter Knego

With much last minute work still in progress, the limited tour included a look at the ship’s 18-foot-tall, 550-square-foot, dual level Loft Suites (which were still being fitted out), 550-square-foot Owner’s Suites, 450-square-foot Deluxe Suites, 240-to-330-square-foot Veranda Suites, and 180-to-220-square-foot Interiors.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Veranda Suite. * Photo: Peter Knego

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Interior Suite. * Photo: Peter Knego

The DUCHESS is the first all-suite river cruise ship in American waters and is geared towards a slightly younger demographic than its siblings. It is further distinguished by the lofty ceiling heights of its two lower decks.

A fourth ship may join the company soon, most likely to be rebuilt from an another casino ship’s hull and, according to John Waggoner, AQSC’s CEO and chairman, to possibly have a more mass market appeal and price point than the line’s current upmarket fleet.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Lincoln Library, facing aft. * Photo: Peter Knego

Public spaces seen on the media tour included the Lincoln Library — built on a mezzanine level between Main Deck (1) and Observation Deck (2).

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Grand Dining Room, as viewed from the Lincoln Library. * Photo: Peter Knego

The Lincoln Library has windows that peer down into the Grand Dining Room.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Lobby Bar, facing port. * Photo: Peter Knego

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Lobby Bar, facing starboard/aft. * Photo: Peter Knego

The Lobby Bar is located on Main Deck at the base of the grand staircase and features dark paneling and crystal chandeliers.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS The Art Walk, facing forward. * Photo: Peter Knego

On the port side of the Lobby Bar, the Fine Arts Gallery is a passage that allows guests to discretely enter and leave the showroom without interrupting performances therein.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Starboard portion of Grand Dining Room, facing aft. * Photo: Peter Knego

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Center portion of Grand Dining Room, facing aft. * Photo: Peter Knego

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS table setting. * Photo: Peter Knego

Accessed via the Lobby Bar, the Grand Dining Room has 20-foot-tall windows on either side flanking double deck alcoves that are reminiscent of the J.M. White Dining Room aboard the AMERICAN QUEEN, although the look is far more contemporary than the AMERICAN QUEEN’s Victoriana.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

Custom carpet design specifically for AMERICAN DUCHESS by David William Kelly. * Photo: Peter Knego

The AMERICAN DUCHESS interiors are the product of David William Kelly, who has also contributed to the interior design of Oceania Cruises’ MARINA and RIVIERA and recent refits of AMERICAN QUEEN and AMERICAN EMPRESS.

American Duchess

Preview performance in the Show Lounge on the eve of the ship’s entry into service. Note musician’s balcony above the stage. * Photo: Peter Knego

Other public spaces either not seen or not ready during the media tour included the Showroom, Baristas coffee bar, a gym, the casual River Club and Terrace eatery, and the open areas on the uppermost Sun Deck.

AMERICAN DUCHESS

AMERICAN DUCHESS Godmother Marissa Applegate. * Photo: Peter Knego

At 1:00 PM Monday, the ship was christened by Marissa Applegate, the daughter of AQSC’s CEO and chairman John Waggoner, who successfully smashed a bottle of Maker’s Mark bourbon onto the ship’s bow railing.

The AMERICAN DUCHESS’ maiden voyage, a 23-night cruise up the Mississippi to Red Hook, Minnesota, is now underway.

 

Keep up to date with Peter Knego on Twitter by clicking here.

All photos by and copyright Peter Knego 2017 unless otherwise noted.

 

Don’t miss great articles, reviews, news & tips about small-ship cruising, subscribe to QuirkyCruise.com for monthly updates!  

© This article is protected by copyright, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the author. All Rights Reserved. QuirkyCruise.com.

Seabourn Order Two New Expedition Ships

These stark, stunning, moody, life-affirming, surreal, melancholic, breathtaking …  (should we go on?) images of Antarctica were all shot in January and February 2017 by Richard White during his frequent journeys to the Great White Continent.

A polar expedition leader and guide, these days Richard works for EYOS, a purveyor of luxury yacht cruises to the world’s most coveted and remote places. In the past he’s also guided for Lindblad Expeditions. As you’ll see, Richard’s an excellent photographer as well.

See more of Richard’s beautiful photography on instagram @richthebirder and reach him directly at richard@eyos-expeditions.com. All images were taken with a Leica X U camera kindly provided by Leica Singapore and are the sole property of Richard White.

To find out more about Richard’s fascinating job and outlook, read our recent Q&A with him: Part 1 and Part 2.

 

The M/Y Hanse Explorer dwarfed by tabular icebergs in Antarctic Sound. * Photo: Richard White

The M/Y Hanse Explorer dwarfed by tabular icebergs in Antarctic Sound. * Photo: Richard White

 

Iceberg arch off the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

Iceberg arch off the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

 

Curious Adelie penguin. * Photo: Richard White

Curious Adelie penguin. * Photo: Richard White

 

Chinstrap penguins nesting at Orne Harbour, Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

Chinstrap penguins nesting at Orne Harbour, Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

 

Gentoo penguins nesting at Neko Harbour, Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

Gentoo penguins nesting at Neko Harbour, Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

 

M/Y Hanse Explorer "parked" in shore-fast ice. * Photo: Richard White

M/Y Hanse Explorer “parked” in shore-fast ice. * Photo: Richard White

 

MY Hanse Explorer still "parked" in shore-fast ice. * Photo: Richard White

MY Hanse Explorer still “parked” in shore-fast ice. * Photo: Richard White

 

Hiking over shore-fast ice. * Photo: Richard White

Hiking over shore-fast ice. * Photo: Richard White

 

Adelie penguins on shore-fast ice. * Photo: Richard White

Adelie penguins on shore-fast ice. Kind of reminds you of that Beatles Abby Road shot. * Photo: Richard White

 

Humpback whale diving along the ice edge. * Photo: Richard White

Humpback whale diving along the ice edge. Can you fathom being this close?! * Photo: Richard White

 

South end of Lemaire Channel, Antarctic Peninsula. Photo: Richard White

South end of Lemaire Channel, Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

 

Again, the south end of Lemaire Channel, Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

Again, the south end of Lemaire Channel, Antarctic Peninsula. * Photo: Richard White

 

© This article is protected by copyright, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the author.  All Rights Reserved. QuirkyCruise.com.

Young passengers boarding 1902-built sidewheeler Interwalden that plies Lake Lucern. * Photo: Ted Scull

By Ted Scull.

The lakes of Switzerland are framed by the snow-streaked Alps and on a crisp clear blue-sky day, to be steamboating across Lake Lucerne or Lac  Leman, is to experience the delights of water travel a century ago. Here is a fond look at those handsome vessels as they are operated in the 21st century. Click here for the full article. Below, scroll through 11 photos to get a taste of Swiss lake travel.

Lake Lucerne

1902-built sidewheeler Interwalden on Lake Lucern. * Photo: Ted Scull

1902-built sidewheeler Unterwalden departs Brunnen on Lake Lucerne. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

First class dining salon aboard 1902-built sidewheeler Interwalden on Lake Lucern. * Photo: Ted Scull

First class dining saloon aboard 1902-built sidewheeler Unterwalden on Lake Lucerne. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

1902-built sidewheeler Interwalden on Lake Lucern, engine room on view. * Photo: Ted Scull

The Unterwalden’s beautifully-maintained rhythmic machinery is on view when underway. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Young passengers boarding 1902-built sidewheeler Interwalden that plies Lake Lucern. * Photo: Ted Scull

Young passengers in period costume board the Unterwalden. * Photo: Ted Scull

Lac Léman

1908-built Italia at Cully on Parade Day in Lac Léman. * Photo Ted Scull

1908-built Italia at Cully sails past on Parade Day on Lac Léman. * Photo Ted Scull

 

1907-built Vevey in Montreux, Lac Léman. * Photo: Ted Scull

1907-built Vevey arriving Montreux, Lac Léman. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

1907-built Vivey on Lac Léman. * Photo: Ted Scull

Vevey sails away to the next landing on Lac Léman. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Line up of 4 of 6 steamboats on Parade Day May 21st 2017 at Cully on Lac Léman. * Photo: Ted Scull

Line up of 4 of 6 steamboats on Parade Day May 21st 2017 at Cully on Lac Léman. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

Line up of 6 steamboats on Parade Day at Cully on Lac Léman. * Photo: Ted Scull

The line up of 6 steamboats on Parade Day at Cully on Lac Léman is about to release hundreds of colored balloons. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

1914-built Savoie headed across Lac Léman to France. * Photo: Ted Scull

1914-built Savoie heads across Lac Léman to France. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

© This article is protected by copyright, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the author. All Rights Reserved. QuirkyCruise.com.

By Lester V. Ledesma.

Nothing says “I’ve been there!” better than a set of awesome travel pictures. I’ve combined my love of photography and travel in a series of “PhotoTreks” to some of Asia’s most exotic destinations, including Vietnam, Bhutan, Myanmar, Philippines, Malaysia and Thailand. One of my most popular offerings is a three-day Northern Vietnam PhotoTrek, which combines a one-night stay in Hanoi with an overnight cruise in the UNESCO World Heritage waters of Halong Bay. Photography and cultural immersion are the main goals of every PhotoTrek, and as such the group size is kept to a maximum of 12 people.

In Hanoi, enjoy the capital’s cozy cafes, ancient monuments and bustling street scene, with great photo ops around every corner. With its craggy rock formations and moody mist, Halong Bay provides the perfect setting for taking stunning landscape photos. These experiences are complemented by informal photography discussions, giving shutterbugs the opportunity to improve their craft.

Hanoi-based Vega Travel provides one of its three mid-sized, traditional wooden cruise boats for the trip, and also books the hotel in Hanoi, such as the Hanoi Bao Khanh next to the Hoan Kiem Lake. The Northern Vietnam PhotoTrek is ideal for weekend photography enthusiasts, and is offered to groups of 6-12 participants at around SGD$900 per person. This price includes lodging, transport and meals, but excludes airfare and visa fees.

Award-winning photojournalist Lester V. Ledesma (www.skylightimages.info) has photographed Asia for almost two decades, and his work appears in numerous international publications. For more information on upcoming PhotoTreks, check out the PhotoTreks FB page at http://www.facebook.com/PhotoTreks.

The PhotoTreks cruise boat docks at one of the many islands in Halong Bay. Traditional wooden boats like these are offered by PhotoTreks’ partner Vega Travel. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Halong Bay

Traditional Indochine patterns adorn one of the cruise boat cabins. Depending on the group size, ships used by PhotoTreks have five to seven fully furnished rooms. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Halong Bay

Dusk finds a fleet of boats moored at one of Halong Bay’s numerous coves. Participants learn basic photography techniques to help them capture the stunning sights. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Halong bay

The fiery hues of sunrise illuminate the karst formations of Halong Bay. The Northern Vietnam PhotoTreks itinerary is designed to bring participants to scenic spots at the best times of day. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in halong bay

From a scenic vantage point, PhotoTreks participants greet the sunrise at Halong Bay with their cameras. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Vietnam

Traditional wooden boats and modern kayaks float side by side in Halong Bay. The Halong Bay cruise features different photographic subjects ranging from landscapes to local life. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ships cruises in Vietnam

This trio of rice farmers was photographed during a stopover en route to the shores of Halong Bay. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Vietam

Hanoi’s bustling street scene is a street photographer’s dream. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Vietnam

Three generations of Hanoians relax at Hoan Kiem Lake. PhotoTreks participants get to fine-tune their people photography skills, among many other aspects of the craft. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Vietnam

A group of ladies practice tai chi moves at dawn by the Hoan Kiam Lake in Hanoi. Cultural immersion and photography are the main goals of every PhotoTreks trip. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

small ship cruises in Vietnam

Vendors in Hanoi rush to bring their merchandise to the market before sunrise. * Photo: Lester V. Ledesma

 

 

 

© This article is protected by copyright, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the author. All Rights Reserved. QuirkyCruise.com.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

by Heidi Sarna & Ted Scull.

See for yourself why small-ship cruises are the only way to go.

Small-ship cruises squeeze through narrow locks. The Gota Canal Steamship Company’s Juno on Sweden’s picturesque Gota Canal.

The 1874-built Juno passes through 66 locks between Gothenberg and Stockholm, Sweden. * Photo: Heidi Sarna

The 1874-built Juno passes through 66 locks between Gothenberg and Stockholm, Sweden. * Photo: Heidi Sarna


 

Small ships carry aboard even smaller vessels for sightseeing. Un-Cruise Adventures takes passengers within feet of icebergs and glaciers.

Alaskan ice by skiff. * Photo: Un-Cruise Adventures

Alaskan ice by skiff. * Photo: Un-Cruise Adventures


 

Small-ship cruises invite you to climb the masts (if they have them!). Harness up and scramble to the crow’s nest look-out aboard Star Clippers 3 clipper ships.

You can climb the masts on Star Clippers cruise. * Photo: Heidi Sarna

You can climb the masts on Star Clippers cruise. * Photo: Heidi Sarna


 

Small-ship cruises put you in close contact with the local population. Coral Expeditions travels to Papua New Guinea.

Coral Discoverer off Manum Island, Papua New Guinea. * Photo: Coral Expeditions

Coral Discoverer off Manum Island, Papua New Guinea. * Photo: Coral Expeditions


 

Small-ship cruises often carry kayaks on board. Paddle your way around the nooks and crannies of Alaska’s Inside Passage with Alaska Dream Cruises.

Alaskan Dream, a catamaran. * Photo: Alaska Dream Cruises.

Alaskan Dream, a catamaran. * Photo: Alaska Dream Cruises.


 

Small-ship cruises invite you to get your hands (and feet) dirty. Here passengers walk down the banks of the Mekong River in Cambodia to board a Pandaw river boat.

Adventure is in store for Pandaw passengers. * Photo: Heidi Sarna

Adventure is in store for Pandaw passengers. * Photo: Heidi Sarna


 

Small ships are often historical. Silolona Sojourns’ stunning Sidatu Bua is a replica of a classic wooden Indonesian Phinisi from centuries ago.

The Sidatu Bua is a masterpiece like her sister. * Photo: Silolona Sojourns

The Sidatu Bua is a masterpiece like her sister. * Photo: Silolona Sojourns


 

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