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Blue Lagoon Cruises

Blue Lagoon Cruises

Blue Lagoon Cruises operates a spiffy small 68-passenger catamaran on informal seven-night cruises to a string of tropical islands in the Fijian chain. While the company was established over a half-century ago, its present style of operation with the FIJI PRINCESS began in 2004. The emphasis is on visits to the islands, the people and a whole host of activities ashore while the vessel is at anchor or even tied to a coconut tree.

There is minimal sailing time as the islands are very close together, and if the water is at all rough, the vessel may shelter on the lee side away from the winds. Fiji is a popular stopover between the U.S. West Coast and New Zealand and Australia, so North Americans may set down here for a week, take the cruise and then fly onward to the antipodes. Cruises operate year-round.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

Ship, Year Delivered & Passengers

FIJI PRINCESS (built 1998, acquired 2004; 68 passengers) Most passengers will be adults (and honeymooners) from Australia, New Zealand (the closest large countries), then British, Europeans and North Americans. Designated cruises, especially during school holidays, include activities for families with children. The crew is all Fijian.

Passenger Decks

Four decks, three with cabins, and no elevator.

Price

$$

Itineraries

Cruises last seven days, while three- and four-day stints are also available with transit from the main embarkation port by high-speed transfer vessel. Very little time is spent sailing, usually not more than four hours a day, as the primary objective is to enjoy the string of islands and the water-based activities.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

The departure port is Denarau Marina, a short distance from Nadi Airport on the main island, for a sail out to the Mamanuca and Tasawa Islands. The cruises offer tropical island settings with virtually uninhabited beaches, a range of water-based activities, and a cultural experience among the island locals and the all-Fiji crew.

As the catamaran FIJI takes just 68 passengers, the atmosphere is relaxed and as social as you would like it to be.

Included Features

All excursions and water sport activities including snorkeling gear, spyboards (lie on a floating platform and look through a window to view underwater activities while propelling with one’s feet),  and kayaks, coffee, tea, juices, filtered water.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

Snorkeling is amazing in this part of the world and gear is included in the fares. * Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

Gratuities, diving gear, sport fishing, and alcoholic beverages are extra. A donation made to the Vinaka Fiji Trust is added to the final bill, and the amount may be removed or adjusted upward or downward. The trust aids villagers who are living below the poverty line, and the cruises visit one of the locations.

Why Go?

Once you leave the main island, you will soon enter another seemingly far away world that is only a few hours sailing aboard the FIJI PRINCESS. The seascapes are blue, while the islands are white sands with tropical landscapes, welcoming local people and adventures ashore and in the calm waters. Fiji makes a fine stopover with direct flights to and from the U.S. West Coast and then via much shorter flights to and from New Zealand or Australia.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

Experience the local culture and customs. * Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

When to Go?

The weather chart shows that the best months to visit are between late March and early December, with November to April having the most rainfall, occurring in brief downpours. Daytime high temperatures range from 79F (26C) to 88F (31C) — not much of a variation in this tropical part of the world. Trade winds are normally east-southeast, and cyclones may appear in the wet season.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

One of the most gorgeous places on earth. * Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

Cabins

The Upper and Middle Orchid Decks hold most of the cabins, here outside with windows and approximately 142 sq. ft. (13 sq. m) with queen or two single beds. Hibiscus Deck, below the Orchid deck, has cabins of 117 sq. ft (11 sq. m) and queen or single beds, windows and a location on the dining saloon deck.

A double bed cabin. * Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

Shared amenities amongst all the cabins include a welcome fruit platter, complimentary daily stocked mini bar (beer, wine, soft drinks & bottled water), a sun care pack, in-cabin Nespresso coffee machine,  tea making facilities, and cabin TV for  DVD viewing.

Public Rooms

The main lounge with bar faces aft on the Middle Orchid Deck, and a second bar is on the top Sky Deck where the sun loungers (deck chairs) are located.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

Bar Lounge on FIJI PRINCESS. * Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

Dining

The covered restaurant is located aft on the lowest Hibiscus Deck and faces aft to a splash pool and then over the stern. The food emphasizes local fresh fruit, fish and vegetables, and is served in an informal setting facing aft over the stern. Seating is open and in addition to breakfast, lunch and dinner, morning coffee and afternoon tea are also served. A boutique and reception are also located on this level.

The dining salon. * Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

Activities & Entertainment

While anchored in a lagoon, shore trips visit remote villages, discover Fijian culture, partake in an island feast as well as learn how to prepare your own, explore several caves, and visit schools. Just relaxing on South Pacific island beaches is another appealing option, and one stop will be at the line’s private beach.

Blue Lagoon Cruises

Being in the water is a big part of a Blue Lagoon Cruise. * Photo: Blue Lagoon Cruises

Water sports choices are swimming, including with manta rays, stand-up paddle boarding, and snorkeling. Diving and fishing trips are optional extras. A glass bottom boat makes trips for viewing underwater. On board, there is a splash pool, spa, and deck chairs on the upper sun deck. Entertainment comes aboard at some island stops.

Special Notes

On trips to Fijian villages, dress is modest. Men are provided with a sulu knee-length skirt-like covering and women are asked to cover up their bare shoulders.

Along the Same Lines

Captain Cook Cruises also operates in Fiji.

Contact

Blue Lagoon Cruises, PO Box PD052, Port Denarau, Fiji Islands; www.bluelagooncruises.com, (679) 675 0500.

 

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Captain Cook Cruises

Captain Cook Cruises Fiji

Captain Cook Cruises is an Australian-owned line that got its start in 1970 when Captain Trevor Haworth began operating cruises and excursions in the Sydney Harbor region, then up north in Queensland along the Great Barrier Reef and in the south on the Murray River. The present Fiji Islands operation includes year-round cruises of 3, 4, and 7 days to Yasawa Islands, 3, 4 and 7 days to the remote northern isles, and the occasional 11-nighter to the out islands.

The focus is on Fiji’s scenic beauty, island exploration, water sports, local island culture and visits to traditional villages. The experience is about as tropical outdoorsy as any small ship cruise could be. The parent company, Sealink Travel Group, also operates an overnight sternwheeler on the Murray River as well as numerous ferry routes throughout Australia. The line also books pre- and post- cruise holiday resort stays, and as Fiji is a hugely popular resort destination there is a large inventory at all price points.

Captain Cook Cruises

Fiji’s out islands are remote and drop dead gorgeous. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

Ship, Year Delivered & Passengers

REEF ENDEAVOUR (built 1996 & 130 passengers).

Passenger Profile

Because of proximity to New Zealand and Australia, the largest numbers originate there, including families (children age five & above) during holiday periods; beyond it’s English speakers from Europe and North Americans, the latter who tend to stopover for several days en route to/from New Zealand or Australia. With a lot of shared activities and experiences, and open seating, meeting others comes naturally. If you prefer a cruise without many other children aboard, be sure to check the Australian and New Zealand school holiday periods. Most of the crew is Fijian.

Passenger Decks

The ship has five decks and an elevator.

Price

$$ to $$$ Moderate to Expensive. Children’s fares apply to ages 5 to 17 when they occupy cabin with adults.

Itineraries

The emphasis is on outdoor activities, both active and sedentary, and normally calling at two islands a day, morning and afternoon, among the 300 available in the Fiji island group.

Captain Cook Cruises Fiji

Yasawa Island. * Map: Captain Cook Cruises Fiji

  • 3- and 4-night Yasawa Island cruises may be combined into a 7-night cruise, all leaving from Nadi (pronounced as if Nandi), also the locale for the international airport.
  • 7-night Remote North Cruises sail further afield to the world heritage colonial town of Levuka, a time capsule of architecture facing a waterfront promenade. Visit markets, hot springs, a garden island, a waterfall lagoon and an extinct volcano. Activities include snorkeling, scuba diving and glass bottom boat sightseeing, plus standing astride the 180th Meridian that marks today and tomorrow.
  • 7-Night 4 Cultures Discovery Cruises circumnavigate Vanua Levu, Fiji’s second’s largest island and explore the islands, rivers and rainforests of the remote north. Visit four distinct cultures: the Ellice Islanders and Banabas, Indian (South Asian) and Fijian people. Snorkel along the world’s third longest barrier reef, sail by tender up the Labasa River to Vanua Levu’s largest town and natural produce market. A lovo feast (cooking on hot rocks in an earthen pit), school visit, choral church service, meke (Fiji-style dancing) and island night are aspects of the cruise to the remote north.
  • The occasional 11-night Lau and Kadavu Discovery Cruise heads to Fiji’s remote north where a lucky few arrive to visit the unspoiled beauty.  Next sailings are November 5, 2019 and March 3, 2020.
Captain Cook Cruises

Meet the locals at the shellmarket. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

Included features

Shore excursions and tours to villages and schools outlined in the day-to-day itineraries, festive meals shore, kayaking, snorkeling and stand-up paddle boarding, on board kids’ club ages 5-9 at specified hours, and post-cruise transfers to Nadi hotels. (Note: A small passenger contribution goes to the school). WiFi is available at most but not all anchorages. The speed will vary considerably.

Why Go?

To enjoy the attractions of South Pacific Islands and delightful tropical weather conditions with outdoor activities on board, ashore, and at beaches and meeting the Fijians. Special interest activities are available for adults and children in marine biology, ecology and environmental issues.

Bula! (Hello) from down under the South Pacific ocean. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

Bula! (Hello) from down under the South Pacific ocean. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

When to Go?

The cruises operate year-round and the busy season coincides with the Southern Hemisphere’s school holidays as Fiji is just four hours from Australia’s East Coast and a bit less from North Island, New Zealand. December to February are hot and humid with afternoon downpours, but being near and on the water softens the heat factor. The driest months are June to August.

Cabins

The largest accommodations are the 4 suites with separate lounges; most standard cabins measure approximately 150 square feet; 6 are interconnected family cabins with twin/double beds that open onto the deck; 49 twins/doubles have two windows and face to a side passage; 11 have portholes, open to an interior corridor and have twin/double beds, plus one or two upper bunks (for families).

A quad cabin, ideal for family cruising. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

A quad cabin, ideal for family cruising. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

Public Rooms

Forward facing panorama lounge and the second Yasawa Lounge looks aft and opens to the outdoor pool with a bar. Sun Deck has outdoor seating, twin spa pools, sauna, gym, bar and BBQ.

Dining

Reserved seating prevails the first night then it’s open sitting for all meals with buffet breakfast and lunch offering both hot and cold dishes that appeal to an international passenger list and feature a lot of island produce. Root plants and coconut are used in cooking. Alfresco barbecue meals occur on the Sun Deck twice on a 7-night cruise. Pineapple, paw paw, papaya and watermelon are main stay fruits; lunches include grilled fish, sausages, chicken, beef, curries and lots of salad fixings. Three-course served dinners feature baked fish, prawns, pork, beef, lamb, and vegetarian main courses. Desserts are fresh fruits, cheese plates, and sweet dishes such as butterscotch pudding with caramel sauce and chocolate pavlova (meringue with fruit and cream). Two themed dinners are Asian (Indian) and Fiji island.

Suite and repeat passengers will have a chance to dine with the captain or chief engineer. Wines from Australia, New Zealand and Washington State that are served at meals are extra with the average bottle from $US25 to $US35; beer $US6. Extra treats are a self-service afternoon tea with cakes and cookies and varied canapés before dinner in the Yasawa Lounge. The Fijian crew is a delight — friendly and helpful. They speak English and Fijian.

Activities & Entertainment

Onboard activities take place in a small gym, sauna, spa and fresh-water pool. For going ashore, a glass-bottom boat is available to view marine life such as the giant manta ray, also snorkeling gear, swimming in the Pacific and in lagoons, and guided islands tours to meet the locals, attend cultural events and visit schools. PADI 5 star scuba diving is extra and a boat is carried. Crew shows are popular and local talent comes aboard.

Snorkeling in the clear waters surrounding Fiji. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

Snorkeling in the clear waters surrounding Fiji. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

Special Notes

Children (age 5+) are always welcome, and the outdoor, activity-based itineraries make the REEF ENDEAVOUR a most attractive family vacation.

Along the Same Lines

Blue Lagoon Cruises also operates in Fiji, while other firms cruise French Polynesia.

Contact

Captain Cook Cruises Fiji, PO Box 349, Milsons Point, NSW 1565, Australia; captaincook.com.au; + 61 2 9206 1111. Representatives: USA 866-202-2371; UK +44 (0) 1787 211 668; NZ +64 21 631474

— TWS

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Blue Lagoon Cruises

10 Great Places Only Small Ship Cruises Go

by Ted Scull & Heidi Sarna.

If you love traveling by water, here are 10 neat places around the world only accessible by our wee quirky fleet of ships, from North America to South America and Europe out to the Far East. Big ships can’t get to any of these cool spots.

The Islands of New England, USA

Yes, a couple of large cruise ships have called at Martha’s Vineyard disgorging many hundreds into poor Vineyard Haven, but they can’t get anywhere near the more charming town of Nantucket. Neither can they get close to the utterly Victorian nature of Block Island, tiny Cutty Hunk in the Elizabeth Islands or through the flood gates to access New Bedford, the former whaling capital of the world.

Jared Coffin House, Nantucket. * Photo: Ted Scull

Jared Coffin House, Nantucket. * Photo: Ted Scull

New York State’s Hudson River Valley

A big cruise ship could not get you beyond the New York City limits, while one of our small ship cruises will take you 150 breathtaking miles up America’s Rhine past stately mansions with Hudson River views and the spectacle of fall foliage as breathtaking as Vermont’s.

Walkway over the Hudson at Poughkeepsie. * Photo: Ted Scull

Walkway over the Hudson at Poughkeepsie. * Photo: Ted Scull

Alaska’s Glacier Bay

Sure, it’s accessible to all sizes of ships with the proper permits — all the big ships sail up to the same glacier then turn around and leave, while small expedition ships do that and more such as venturing up to the Johns Hopkins Glacier, an immense growing glacier that big ship passengers will never see. Hundreds of harbor seals will be lounging on the ice flows.

Glacier Bay, Alaska. * Photo: Ted Scull

Glacier Bay, Alaska. * Photo: Ted Scull

Upper Reaches of the Amazon River

Medium-size cruise ships can make it 1,000 miles up the broad Amazon to Manaus where they have to turn around stopping at locations where hundreds go ashore to over-visited villages, while small riverboats sail the Upper Amazon and its amazing network of tributaries to some of the most remote places on earth reached by water. Here riverside villages are completely isolated from one another, except by small boat, and wildlife abounds in the water, in the sky and deep in the rainforest.

Lily pads along the Amazon.* Photo: Ted Scull

Lily pads along the Amazon.* Photo: Ted Scull

The Length of the Chilean Fjords

The big ships duck in and out where they can safely turnaround while small ship cruises can travel the length of Chile’s inside passage south to the tip of South America while sailing close to numerous glaciers and up narrow inlets to spot mammals and birds, and stopping at islands en route.

Laguna San Rafael, Chilean Fjords. * Photo: Ted Scull

Laguna San Rafael, Chilean Fjords. * Photo: Ted Scull

Mother Russia

Big ships dock at St. Petersburg, a wonderful city with a couple of palaces just outside, but to see Mother Russia, an inland river cruise will expose you to the vast interior countryside and allow you to step ashore to see Russian life in small towns and cities.

Cruising into the heart of Mother Russia. * Photo: Ted Scull

Cruising into the heart of Mother Russia. * Photo: Ted Scull

The Interior of France

River cruises take you into the heart of France directly to Claude Monet’s Giverny Gardens, not to a coastal port with a long bus ride inland like the big ships offer. On a small ship river or canal cruise, there’s no need to endure an even longer drive from a Mediterranean port to spend a few hours at the wonder of Avignon as riverboats docs just outside the medieval walls.

Avignon, medieval France. * Photo: Ted Scull

Avignon, medieval France. * Photo: Ted Scull

Fiji’s Out Islands

When ships of all sizes cross the Pacific they may make a stop at Fiji’s major port, but only small ship cruises sail from Fiji to the many nearby out islands and drop anchor in a blue lagoon to go snorkeling, enjoy a beach barbecue, and visit a local village and its school.

Out Islands - Fiji, South Pacific. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

Out Islands – Fiji, South Pacific. * Photo: Captain Cook Cruises

The Interior of Cambodia, Vietnam & Laos

River cruises sail into the interior of all three countries via the Mekong River and its tributaries, visiting exotic cities like Phnom Penh (Cambodia) and Luang Prabang (Laos). Meanwhile, big ships can only get to the coastal cities of Vietnam, and it’s still a two- to four-hour drive each way to Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City.

Ted samples the local delicacies! * Photo: Ted Scull

Ted samples the local delicacies! * Photo: Ted Scull

Eastern Indonesia

Big ships can get you close enough to Bali to go ashore and join the masses of tourists already there, but small ship cruises explore the eastern end of the archipelago, from the Raja Ampat islands to Papua New Guinea, sailing deep into the island’s interior via the Sepik River.

Outrigger canoes, Indonesia. * Photo: Ted Scull

Outrigger canoes, Indonesia. * Photo: Ted Scull

 

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